In this week's episode, son Casey describes some of his experiences as a paramedic, including a stint on Alaska's North Slope. Larre reminisces about how an ambulance crew worked back in the day. Press the play button to hear the stories.

Since the theme this week is emergency services, I asked Larre for his advice on what a person should keep in an emergency kit. He suggested a backpack that can be kept in your vehicle or your travel supplies when you're on a road trip or adventuring in the wilderness. His recommended contents follow. I didn’t have photos of our emergency services family members in action, so you’ll get some photographic advice from other members of the family.

Warmth. Staying warm and dry are key to survival. Larre carries both matches (in a waterproof container) and a butane lighter for starting fires. He also recommends a long-burning candle as a handy way to keep a flame available. He likes to use a candle lantern under his poncho to keep him warm when he’s sitting around in the woods. Personally, I’d use a pocket hand warmer. Wrapping up in a space blanket keeps you warm, and a tarp draped over some parachute cord is a good improvised shelter.

seek dry shelter

seek dry shelter

First aid. A well-stocked first aid kit is essential, but it won’t do much good if you don’t know how to treat common injuries and afflictions. Stay alert to signs of heat stroke, hypothermia, or frostbite. Know how to treat burns, cuts, bites (insect, snake, animal), blisters, infections, sprains and broken bones. 

know how to treat bites

know how to treat bites

be alert for frostbite

be alert for frostbite

Tools. Larre recommends carrying both a Swiss army knife and a multitool. That way you have a range of sizes and variety of blades and tools. Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it, he says. His favorites are Victorinox, but he also has a Leatherman multitool that serves him well.

Food and water. Rather than carry around water, which is heavy, keep a wide-mouth plastic bottle or drinking pouch to fill when needed. You’ll want a personal water filter and/or purifier tablets to prevent water-borne illness. Pack some lightweight food (dried, MREs, hard candy, snack bars, jerky) that won’t spoil. To be even more self-sufficient, pack some fish hooks and line. 

carry fishing line and know how to use it

carry fishing line and know how to use it

pack dried, nutritious food

pack dried, nutritious food

Miscellaneous. Small flashlights are available in a variety of styles. Larre is partial to his headlamp, because it’s hands-free. Don’t forget spare batteries. A mini sewing kit can be helpful for repairing clothes or sewing up injuries. Always have a signal mirror and emergency whistle on hand to help people find you. 

make sure your vehicle is up to the trip

make sure your vehicle is up to the trip

the mosquitoes can be killers

the mosquitoes can be killers

Larre didn't mention sunscreen and bug dope, but pack them when conditions call for them. The year our family left Alaska, 1985, news reports said mosquitoes were so thick that they were causing moose to die from distress. 

Last but not least, remember that prevention is the key to safety. Make sure your vehicle is in good working order before you head out on a road trip. Dress for the weather, stay hydrated, rest when you need it, and have a good guide book.

dress for the weather

dress for the weather

stay hydrated

stay hydrated

take a break when you need it

take a break when you need it

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