This week's story is about a hunting trip Larre took with son Bill and three of their friends. They headed out to Onion Bay on Raspberry Island, west of Kodiak, using the Best Friends as their base and a smaller Hewescraft aluminum boat to move along the shoreline. Click the Play button below to hear the details.

Captain Larre on the Hewescraft

Captain Larre on the Hewescraft

 

The plan was to find the deer along the shoreline, as the snow usually pushes them down from the mountain heights by this time of the year. It is legal, but extra challenging, to shoot from the boat if the engine is off. 

Billie's Hewescraft in Onion Bay

Billie's Hewescraft in Onion Bay

M/V Best Friends in Onion Bay

M/V Best Friends in Onion Bay

foggy morning

foggy morning

fog thick as pea soup

fog thick as pea soup

fog lifting

fog lifting

icing up on the bay

icing up on the bay

Plenty of foxes were scavenging along the shoreline, so the guys did do some fox hunting from the boat. Adult foxes are 22 to 32 inches from their nose to the end of their body, and their tail is 14 to 16 inches long. They can weigh from 6 to 15 pounds but their luxurious coats make them look much bigger. Although they come in three color phases, the species is called red fox.

fox-on-shore
hunting-from-boat
fox-hunting

Larre's photo collection backed up his description of the large number and variety of birds they saw during the trip. Unfortunately, birds move fast and/or keep their distance, so I didn't find any photos of ducks and geese that seemed good enough to post here. There is a cool photo of an eagle perched on his nest that was strategically sited atop a tall, offshore rock

black tail deer on shore

black tail deer on shore

eagle nest and lookout

eagle nest and lookout

150-foot Sitka spruce

150-foot Sitka spruce

shoreline-Raspberry-Island

Where the Sitka spruce groves grow along the clifftops, it is always hard for me to get the proper perspective on how big everything is. As you get close to the shoreline, you can see the cliffs looming overhead and the trees matching the cliffs' height. Larre, who is a good judge of distances and lengths, says the fallen spruce in the above photo was at least 150 feet. Obviously, the guys don't go ashore where they would have to deal with these cliffs, except to walk along the beach to retrieve their prey.

Since the deer were enjoying the non-snow conditions higher up on the mountains, the group had to do some major hiking. You'll have to listen to the podcast to find out what kind of luck they had with that pursuit.

foggy-mountainside-binoculars
hunting-Onion-Bay
Sitka-black-tail-doe

Comment